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Grandparent Visitation Rights In Nebraska

by jacquelyn on December 25, 2010

Grandparents Visitation Rights

All states now have grandparents visitation rights but the Laws in each state still vary.

Nebraska Revised Statute 43-1802

43-1802. Visitation; conditions; order; modification.

(1) A grandparent may seek visitation with his or her minor grandchild if:

(a) The child’s parent or parents are deceased;

(b) The marriage of the child’s parents has been dissolved or petition for the dissolution of such marriage has been filed, is still pending, but no decree has been entered; or

(c) The parents of the minor child have never been married but paternity has been legally established.

(2) In determining whether a grandparent shall be granted visitation, the court shall require evidence concerning the beneficial nature of the relationship of the grandparent to the child. The evidence may be presented by affidavit and shall demonstrate that a significant beneficial relationship exists, or has existed in the past, between the grandparent and the child and that it would be in the best interests of the child to allow such relationship to continue. Reasonable rights of visitation may be granted when the court determines by clear and convincing evidence that there is, or has been, a significant beneficial relationship between the grandparent and the child, that it is in the best interests of the child that such relationship continue, and that such visitation will not adversely interfere with the parent-child relationship.

(3) The court may modify an order granting or denying such visitation upon a showing that there has been a material change in circumstances which justifies such modification and that the modification would serve the best interests of the child.

Source

    Laws 1986, LB 105, § 2.

Annotations

Nebraska’s grandparent visitation statutes are narrowly drawn and explicitly protect parental rights while taking the child’s best interests into consideration. Hamit v. Hamit, 271 Neb. 659, 715 N.W.2d 512 (2006).
Under the Nebraska statutes, a court is without authority to order grandparent visitation unless a petitioning grandparent can prove by clear and convincing evidence that (1) there is, or has been, a significant beneficial relationship between the grandparent and the child; (2) it is in the best interests of the child that such relationship continue; and (3) such visitation will not adversely interfere with the parent-child relationship. Hamit v. Hamit, 271 Neb. 659, 715 N.W.2d 512 (2006).
Grandparents’ existing visitation rights are not automatically terminated by an adoption, but can be modified upon a showing of cause with the child’s best interests at issue. Raney v. Blecha, 258 Neb. 731, 605 N.W.2d 449 (2000).
In order for a trial court to grant grandparent visitation under subsection (2) of this section, evidence must be adduced to enable the court to find “by clear and convincing evidence that there is, or has been, a significant beneficial relationship between the grandparent and the child, that it is in the best interests of the child that such relationship continue, and that such visitation will not adversely interfere with the parent-child relationship”. Nothing contained within the modification provisions of the  statutes makes the modification of previously ordered  visitation dependent upon the parent’s continued parental relationship with the child. By the grandparent visitation statutes’ express provision of a method by which to modify previously ordered grandparent visitation, the Legislature intended that grandparent visitation granted under those statutes not be interrupted by the adoption statutes. Pier v. Bolles, 257 Neb. 120, 596 N.W.2d 1 (1999).
The statutory criteria for modification of a prior grandparent visitation order are different than the criteria for obtaining grandparent visitation initially. Grandparents’ efforts to undermine the relationship between a mother and her children do not serve the best interests of the children. Morris v. Corzatt, 255 Neb. 182, 583 N.W.2d 26 (1998).
This section sets out criteria for awarding grandparent visitation which must be proved by clear and convincing evidence before a court may exercise its discretionary authority to grant visitation rights. Eberspacher v. Hulme, 248 Neb. 202, 533 N.W.2d 103 (1995).
After the deaths of the minor child’s biological parents, the child’s maternal biological grandparents became his parents by adopting him. Therefore, the child’s parents are not deceased within the meaning of this statute, and the paternal biological grandparents cannot seek court ordered visitation under subsection (1)(a) of this section. Rust v. Buckler, 247 Neb. 852, 530 N.W.2d 630 (1995).
The grandparent visitation statutes do not provide for an award of attorney fees, nor is there a uniform course of procedure in these cases which would allow recovery of attorney fees. A grandparent visitation action may be initiated either during the dissolution proceeding or after the marriage of the parents has been dissolved. Rosse v. Rosse, 244 Neb. 967, 510 N.W.2d 73 (1994).
Pursuant to subsection (2) of this section, a juvenile court is not the proper venue for a grandparent to petition for grandparent visitation under the grandparent visitation statutes. It is within the juvenile court’s statutory jurisdiction to determine a motion for visitation asserted by a grandparent who has properly intervened. In re Interest of Dylan W., 8 Neb. App. 1039, 606 N.W.2d 847 (2000).
The overriding and paramount consideration in determining grandparent visitation rights is the best interests of the children. The disruption to the lives of the grandchildren, including the distance of travel to exercise visitation rights, is clearly an appropriate consideration in the award of grandparent visitation privileges. Beal v. Endsley, 3 Neb. App. 589, 529 N.W.2d 125 (1995).
The standard of review in cases involving visitation by grandparents is the same as the standard of review in other custody and visitation cases. Dice v. Dice, 1 Neb. App. 241, 493 N.W.2d 207 (1992).

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Exercise Balls January 2, 2011 at 11:58 pm

nice post. thanks.

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